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In 2010, an incident in San Bruno, CA brought national attention to the oil and gas industry when a natural gas pipeline exploded in a residential neighborhood, leveling homes and claiming several lives. The resulting shockwave from the explosion was equivalent to a 1.1 magnitude earthquake.

In 2010, two tragic events – a million-gallon crude oil spill near Marshall,
MI and a natural gas explosion in a San Bruno, CA neighborhood – occurred within two weeks of each other, focusing the nation’s attention on pipeline safety.

Real experts in the tricky field of natural gas measurement don’t come along every day. Those who do emerge find that their names and reputations precede them, be it in the operational, commercial or research side of the business. And that is where we find John Lansing today.

Ensuring the integrity of subsea pipeline welds is vital for the oil and gas industry, with potentially damaging practical and economic consequences resulting otherwise. Vigorous testing before the pipe is placed to service is crucial and can be the difference between a successful project and an expensive disaster.

An ICF report determined shipping oil overseas would spur the U.S. economy, lowering gasoline prices in the process.

The growth in U.S. imports of Canadian oil sands in recent years has not impacted the overall greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity of the U.S. supply mix, according to a new study by IHS, a leading global source of critical information and insight. The growth of oil sands imports were offset by substitution for similar sources of supply and by increase in lower-carbon tight oil displacing relatively higher carbon imports from Africa and elsewhere, the study says.

Vast production growth in the northeastern United States is significantly altering the pipeline flow throughout much of the continent, according to a recent Moody’s Investors Service report.

The unexpected and stunning success of the shale plays in the United States over the past decade has dramatically changed the nation’s energy picture for years, if not decades, to come.

Wet gas meter calibrations are usually done using natural gas, kerosene and water. Increasingly, gas producers are questioning a meter’s ability to measure wet gas entrained with the unique liquids found on platforms and wellheads (viscous hydrocarbons, paraffin based/high-wax liquids, sea water, brine solutions, MEG and other custom liquids).

In Alaska, energy planning has always been as big and bold as the state’s seemingly endless resources and landscape. But the latest blueprint emerging from the ashes of a series of abandoned plans to tap the state’s vast natural gas resources in the north makes anything that came before it miniscule in scope. Whether it is hubris or overreaching, state officials are ready to roll the dice on a gas scenario that will cost in excess of $50 billion and take a decade or more to pull off.

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