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Faced with a study projecting that the pipeline industry will need an average of $30 billion per year worth of new infrastructure to satisfy oil, gas and liquids transportation needs between 2014 and 2035, pipeline operators foresee struggle and risk as well as opportunity.

The demand for energy is high and projected to increase steadily by at least 2% per year, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). As a result, oil and gas products are being shipped at a faster rate than ever before, increasingly making their way across international borders to meet demand.

In February, when Summit Natural Gas of Maine began providing natural gas to Gardiner businesses and residents who until then had relied on propane or heating oil, it was only part of a much bigger story.

Modern centrifugal compressors using double-end, variable-speed electric motors are high performance and reliable options for pipeline compression stations. Such a compressor train is equipped with two compressor casings coupled through two gear units on either side of a double-end variable speed drive (VSD) motor.

In recent years as the natural gas business has changed, so have the associations that work and support the utility industry. But one focus has never changed: the commitment to safety, whether it is on-the-job or in the delivery of products to the end consumer.

Well-organized workforce housing can be a valuable partner for companies pursuing their sustainable development goals, as well as a component of long-term profitability.

For the fourth year in a row, analysts at Capacity Center reported the total volume of natural gas pipeline capacity traded by the top 20 companies increased over the previous year – this time by a “remarkable” 106%, topping 15.8 Bcf/d.

Pipeline integrity management is a hot topic. Pipeline failures, while statistically rare, can be catastrophic and have captured attention as never before. Risk tolerance for pipeline failures from existing pipelines is very low, and getting lower.

Many utilities are expanding portfolios of power generation assets, and as older coal-fired plants retire, utilities are deciding what must replace them. While some older plants are candidates for retrofitting to natural gas, others will be forced to shut down.

The term “hazard analyses” is intended to cover a number of team-based assessment methodologies, including hazard identification (HAZID), hazard and operability (HAZOP), “what-ifs” and checklists. The collective intent of these methodologies is to minimize risk to acceptable or “practicable,” levels.

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