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For process monitoring applications, the wireless revolution has come of age. Particularly in the upstream sector, oil and gas operations have fully realized the value proposition advertised by manufacturers. Wireless transmitters are now very commonly applied to measurements of level, pressure and temperature at compressors, gathering lines, separators, rod pumps and well-head “trees.”

Wireless instruments have proved to be cost-effective, reliable, safe, secure, simple and environmentally friendly.

Although we are already 15 years deep into the 21st century and women working at the top rungs of professional life no longer turn heads, when it comes to the “hard” numbers-crunching parts in the global economy – science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) – women still get asked why they selected this way to earn a buck.

This same question is occasionally put to Paula Gant, holder of a doctorate degree in economics and the deputy assistant secretary for oil and natural gas in the federal Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy.

Oil and natural gas are two fossil fuels that account for a great deal of the energy used in the world. What they have in common is that they are found deep in the earth, sometimes underneath the ocean bed, and they have to be extracted through the drilling process. The fluids that come out of these wells generally include a mixture of gas, water, and oil. In addition, they may contain sand and sediment. These components eventually have to be separated and measured before they can be usefully processed.

With reserves of 1,093 Tcf, Canada is the world’s fifth-largest producer of dry natural gas, ranking behind the United States, Russia, Iran and Qatar.

About two-thirds of Canada’s 156 Bcm of gas output comes from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) that straddles the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains in British Columbia and the plains of the Yukon, southwestern Manitoba, southern Saskatchewan and Alberta.

The latest Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015) prepared by the federal Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents long-term annual projections of energy supply, demand and prices through 2040. This analysis focuses on six scenarios: a reference case, low and high economic growth cases, low and high oil price cases, and the high oil and gas resource case.

With Congress riled about PHMSA's slow implementation of the last pipeline safety law, the Obama administration has nominated a new administrator for the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration who lacks pipeline and hazardous materials experience. Nor has she ever been a regulator.

Marie Therese Dominguez began in the Clinton White House and worked her way through administrative positions in the
Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Postal Service and the Army, where she spent the last two years as deputy assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works.

In the wake of Energy Transfer Enterprises’ (ETE) thus far unsuccessful takeover bid of Williams Cos., some in the industry are predicting more of the same type of activity as cheap energy spurs stronger companies to look for less sound rivals to gobble up.

Service companies of every sort are scattered throughout the oil, gas and utilities industries. Mosaic is a Washington state-based business that moves its offerings one step further: by using its industry experience and analytical insight to develop strategy and consulting, training and technology services that are specifically designed for each customer.

Integrity assessment has always been a part of operations and maintenance activities. As plant piping and pipeline infrastructure has aged, industry first developed basic tools, and as their importance became apparent, these tools improved to meet those increasing needs.

Oil is not the only energy source that is seeing a glut. Growing supplies of natural gas could soon result in a similar phenomenon.

It was only a year and a half ago that the United States, and the northeast in particular, saw supplies dwindle to exceptionally low levels, forcing prices to temporarily spike. The Northeast experienced a freezing winter, leading to high levels of consumption as millions of people tried to keep warm. Natural gas storage levels plummeted to lows not seen in years.

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