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Pipeline integrity managers routinely receive inline inspection (ILI) tool data, in some cases, for the second or third pig run on a particular segment of pipe. Integrity managers largely spend time on the first ILIs in classifying anomalies under Part 195 and Part 192 criteria, excavating these anomalies and repairing the pipeline as necessary, based on the findings.

The first thing to remember in analyzing Alaska is that every man, woman and child who resides there is in the energy business, thanks to a state oil tax-funded special investment fund that pays an average of $1,000 annually to every resident.

A certain amount of standardization in any process can be beneficial to stakeholders. In the case of pipeline risk assessment, standardization establishes process acceptability. This leads to consistent and fair regulatory oversight as well as minimum levels of analysis rigor.

In today’s bustling pipeline industry, what could be better than having someone with expertise and long-standing relationships with both operators and contractors as head of a major industry organization?

For the foreseeable future, fossil fuels will remain the dominant source of the world’s primary energy production. There is growing concern that the use of these carbon-based fuels produce greenhouse gases, principally carbon dioxide (CO-2), which adversely affects the global climate and environment. One way to mitigate the problem is to use carbon capture, transportation, and storage (CCTS) techniques and systems.

Recently filed class-action lawsuits by North Dakota landowners have brought renewed attention to the controversial practice of gas flaring in that state. In their suits, the landowners claim that major producers in the region, including Continental Resources, XTO and Marathon are costing those owners their share of royalties on as much as $100 million per month of value in natural gas that has gone up in flames in order to keep oil production flowing.

The line of functionality between supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and distributed control system (DCS) is blurring.

Standard practices today simply use human machine interfaces (HMI) as windows into a system by allowing some information to be passed back and forth through those windows. This method anticipates the user having the knowledge to use that information both in and out of the system, such as coming up with solutions to problems or passing the information along to the correct individuals.

Promigas is a natural gas transportation company on the Atlantic coast of Colombia that, on average, transports 0.3 Bcf/d and may reach 0.6 Bcf/d at peak times. Its system consists of pipes ranging from 1-inch to 32-inch diameter with four entry points and 330 exit points, serving about 6.2 million homes.

Our increasingly digital world – with all of the texting, emailing, tweeting, posting, downloading and streaming that’s become commonplace – is creating huge amounts of data, more than than ever before. Pipeline operators are faced with a similar phenomenon when it comes to information overload. Intelligent devices for safety, fire and gas, instrumentation, intelligent motor control and condition-based monitoring offer many individual types of information, each with related alarms.

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