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LINCOLN, NE (AP) — State regulators have approved a controversial disposal well in northwest Nebraska for wastewater generated by oil and natural gas production.

The Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission voted 2-0 on Wednesday in favor of the project, proposed by Colorado-based Terex Energy Corp.

The company wants to truck in salty groundwater and chemical-laden fracking wastewater from oil operations in Wyoming, Colorado and, eventually, Nebraska, to an old oil well on a ranch in southern Sioux County.

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Justice Department says two subsidiaries of ExxonMobil have agreed to pay almost $5 million in government penalties for a 2013 oil spill in a central Arkansas community.

A consent decree filed in U.S. District Court in Little Rock on Wednesday says the companies would pay about $3.2 million in federal civil penalties in addition to addressing pipeline safety issues and oil-response capacity. They would pay $1 million in state civil penalties, $600,000 for a project to improve water quality at Lake Conway and $280,000 for the state's legal costs.

April 2015, Vol. 242, No. 4

With energy security and climate change at the top of the global agenda, carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) is gaining momentum. CCUS technology offers a solution supporting production of incremental hydrocarbon reserves from existing fields while storing CO2 away from the atmosphere.

March 2015, Vol. 242, No. 3

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy calls our nation’s natural gas abundance “a game-changer in our ability to really move forward with pollution reductions.” She’s right. Expanding natural gas use for power generation is the primary reason the U.S. has reduced carbon emissions more than any other country over the past eight years and driven sulfur dioxide and smog-forming NOx emissions down by more than two-thirds over the past two decades.

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The Obama administration announced a plan to cut methane emissions from pipeline operations but gave no specifics beyond the federal agencies which would handle rule-makings. The technical details of those rule-makings and the extent of the cut of methane emissions they seek to produce won't be known for some time.

January 2015, Vol. 242, No. 1

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A pipeline oil spill in Montana that contaminated a river and a city's drinking water supply is adding to fears about a proposed pipeline to carry oil from western North Dakota to a terminal in Illinois for distribution to refineries in eastern states.

February 2015, Vol. 242, No. 2

With the continuing expansion of natural gas development in shale plays across the nation, pipeline infrastructure continues to be built out, with product making the trek from source points to downstream consumers. However, not every end-user has access to affordable natural gas yet.

February 2015, Vol. 242, No. 2

I hope the industry is paying attention to some regionalized developments that could hamper activity, at least in the short term.

February 2015, Vol. 242, No. 2

British Columbia has adopted a regulation to ensure pipelines built to support LNG facilities will not be permitted to transport oil or diluted bitumen. This follows concerns expressed in environmental assessments and by First Nations about the long-term pipeline use.

February 2015, Vol. 242, No. 2

In November, President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping surprised the world by agreeing in principle to targets for carbon dioxide emissions in a symbolic effort to address climate change. This is a pact of historic magnitude that recognizes a need for the world’s two largest emitters – both longstanding antagonists – to reduce future release of greenhouse gas. But aside from a handshake and a promise, what will actually come from this mutual recognition?

The 26th World Gas Conference is the largest and most prestigious conference in the global gas industry calendar gathering thousands of leading energy players and decision makers.

In June 2015 Paris will welcome over 4,000 conference delegates from 100 countries. More than 500 speakers will discuss current and future industry developments. Numerous social and technical networking events have been organised for delegates to grow their global network, showcase their findings and build strong partnerships.

January 2015, Vol. 242, No. 1

GLENDIVE, Mont. (AP) — Workers recovered about 10,000 gallons of oil from a ruptured pipeline that spilled crude into Yellowstone River and contaminated the drinking water supply of an eastern Montana city downstream.

January 2015, Vol. 242, No. 1

Natural gas production and pipeline construction thrive on predictability. They depend on reliably meeting milestones and deadlines in order to connect new sources of energy into supply lines.

January 2015, Vol. 242, No. 1

Canadian hydrocarbon production is growing and the nation is looking to pursue offshore markets as an important element of a strategy for expanded oil and natural gas sales.

January 2015, Vol. 242, No. 1

As the 2014 mid-term elections faded from view, one cogent footnote of the political power change was the significant shift in the money and manner of spending it in the national environmental movement. Even some of their harshest critics were noting a higher level of professionalism and use of legitimate spokespersons as they attempted to spend their growing cash infusion more strategically.

December 2014, Vol. 241, No. 12

It’s just a few days before Thanksgiving, so let’s talk turkey and football. The Keystone pipeline has never really been about energy. It’s been a political football almost since the day TransCanada proposed a pipeline to bring Canadian oil sands product to Gulf Coast refineries.

November 2014, Vol. 241, No. 11

A study has pinpointed the likely source of most natural gas contamination in drinking-water wells associated with hydraulic fracturing, and it’s not the source many people may have feared. What’s more, the problem may be fixable: improved construction standards for cement well linings and casings at hydraulic fracturing sites.

November 2014, Vol. 241, No. 11

One top federal pipeline regulator left her job and a prominent state regulator is coming to Washington to fill a second high-profile pipeline job. Cynthia Quarterman left as administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) Oct. 3. No replacement has been named. Meanwhile, the White House nominated Colette Honorable as a commissioner at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). When confirmed, which is likely, she would probably be appointed chairman. Honorable is chair of the Public Service Commission in Arkansas.

October 2014, Vol. 241, No. 10

When global business consulting giant Accenture finished a recent treatise on shale oil and natural gas development, it identified eight key factors needed to make exploitation of shale viable, and the first three are found in abundance in successful U.S. shale plays from North Dakota’s Bakken to Texas’ Eagle Ford. They are geology, land considerations and the existence of an unconventional energy resource service sector.

October 2014, Vol. 241, No. 10

$3.25. Remember that number.

These days I avoid watching the evening news. ISIS, Ebola, Ukraine, Putin, Iraq, Gaza, Boko Haram, the Khorasan Group, Ferguson, etc. Some days I wish I could just stay in bed.