News

A big sigh of disappointment echoed across the land May 8, for it had to come to pass that Johnny Football would no longer launch those beautiful spirals or befuddle opposing defenses with his dazzling footwork. Perhaps it was a sigh of relief, as Texans could now take a deep breath, grateful the circus was finally over, because Johnny Football would merely become Johnny Footnote, a legend, albeit a brief one, in Lone Star folklore.

Just as onshore production methods change and evolve over time, so too do environmental regulations. On Aug. 16, 2012, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published final regulatory updates specific to onshore oil and natural gas production that span from well completion to transmission. Deciphering and gaining a better understanding of these regulations will remove costly compliance pitfalls during normal operations.

While the energy industry’s share of the economy is on the upswing, the business is in many ways still a specialty field, with innumerable complex issues at play between companies, regulators and the public when it comes to development, conservation and jobs. Few people understand the interplay well enough to provide context to those not in the midst of it, and those in the middle can lose sight of the big picture. Bernard “Bud” Weinstein, Ph.D., is applying his considerable talents to bridging those gaps.

North America’s energy revolution is alive and well! That was the message at Pipeline & Gas Journal’s 10th annual Pipeline Opportunities Conference March 25 at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. Issues covered included quality control for gas pipeline construction, the Pipeline Safety Act, prospects for infrastructure expansions to support new supply sources, the outlook for labor and employment and the benefits of working in an energy state like Texas.

Gov. Jack Dalrymple and other state officials joined North Dakota LNG in announcing a new liquefied natural gas (LNG) production facility will go online in Tioga this summer.

Faced with a study projecting that the pipeline industry will need an average of $30 billion per year worth of new infrastructure to satisfy oil, gas and liquids transportation needs between 2014 and 2035, pipeline operators foresee struggle and risk as well as opportunity.

The demand for energy is high and projected to increase steadily by at least 2% per year, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). As a result, oil and gas products are being shipped at a faster rate than ever before, increasingly making their way across international borders to meet demand.

In February, when Summit Natural Gas of Maine began providing natural gas to Gardiner businesses and residents who until then had relied on propane or heating oil, it was only part of a much bigger story.

Modern centrifugal compressors using double-end, variable-speed electric motors are high performance and reliable options for pipeline compression stations. Such a compressor train is equipped with two compressor casings coupled through two gear units on either side of a double-end variable speed drive (VSD) motor.

A federal court decision allowing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to move forward with a rule limiting mercury emissions from power plants has heightened concerns in some quarters about interstate pipeline infrastructure inadequacy.

Syndicate content